GED Practice

GED Science Review: Earth in Space


Questions:
Directions: Choose the answer to each question.

Questions 1 and 2 refer to the chart below.



  1. If a planet is more than one astronomical unit from the sun, what does that imply?
    • It takes more than 365 days to complete one orbit.
    • It takes less than 24 hours to complete one rotation.
    • It is likely to have a higher density than Earth does.
    • It is likely to have a smaller diameter than Earth does.
  2. It takes the sun's light 8 minutes to reach Earth. How many minutes does it take the sun's light to reach Neptune?

    __________ minutes

    Questions 3 and 4 refer to the following passage.

    Optical telescopes use light to produce images of objects that are far away. In 1610, Galileo discovered four of Jupiter's moons by using an optical telescope. However, optical telescopes on Earth cannot produce large images of objects outside the solar system. No matter how powerful the telescope, stars are so distant that they look like points of light. In addition, the atmosphere distorts the light passing through it, making images fuzzy.
    Today there are optical telescopes that orbit above Earth's atmosphere. The Hubble Space Telescope was launched in 1990. it has provided stunning, clear images of planets and moons in the solar system as well as of distant stars and galaxies. Newer telescopes have replaced the Hubble.
  3. Which statement can be inferred from the passage but is not stated directly?
    • The atmosphere distorts light that passes through it.
    • Optical telescopes magnify images of distant objects.
    • Stars have more detail than we can see by observing them on Earth.
    • Galileo discovered four of Jupiter's moons in 1610 using a telescope.
  4. According to the passage, what is one advantage of placing powerful telescopes in orbit around Earth?
    • Telescopes in orbit gather light from the visible spectrum.
    • Telescopes in orbit are closer to the objects scientist wants to view.
    • Telescope in orbit provide cleared images than similar telescopes on the ground.
    • Telescopes in orbit are most advanced than earlier telescopes built on observatories.

      Questions 5 through 7 refer to the passage and the graph below.

      Most astronomers accept that the universe began about 10 to 20 billion years ago in an explosion called the Big Bang. Just after the Big Bang, the universe was a small cloud of extremely hot and compressed hydrogen and helium. As the universe expanded, it cooled unevenly, and the gases began to form clumps. Because of the force of gravity, the clumps contracted and became galaxies. Today, the universe consists of about 100 billion galaxies that continue to move away from one another. There is much evidence to support the Big Bang Theory. Galaxies are moving away from each other in every direction, as if they all once came from the same place. The farther away a galaxy is, the faster it appears to move, which is consistent with an expanding universe. In addition, cosmic background radiation (CBR), left over from the Big Bang, has been observed by radio telescopes in every direction in space. Ripples in the CBR indicate areas of density needer for the formation of galaxies.
      However, there is some disagreement about what will happen to the universe. Its fate depends on the amount of mass it contains and its gravitational effect. Will it continue to expand? will it stop at a certain size? Will it start to contract? Three different
      possibilities are shown below.

  5. Which of the following situations most closely resembles the Big Bang?
    • Sparks fly as a match is lit.
    • A bonfire emits light, heat, and smoke.
    • Fireworks explode, sending sparks, smoke, and ashes in all directions.
    • Two cannonballs collide in the air, stick together, and fall to the ground.
  6. What can be inferred from the passage and graph about the fate of the universe?
    • The size of the universe is fixed across time.
    • A universe that expands forever is not possible.
    • The mass of the universe will determine its fate.
    • Scientists have measured the mass of the universe.

      Directions: Write your answer on a separate sheet of paper.
  7. Suppose that scientist find the universe to have more than the critical amount of mass. How would observations made by scientists in the distant future differ as a result? How would they remain the same? cite multiple pieces of evidence from the passage to support you response.
Answer:

  1. It takes more than 365 days to complete one orbit.
  2. 240
  3. Stars have more detail than we can see by observing them on Earth.
  4. Telescope in orbit provide cleared images than similar telescopes on the ground.
  5. Fireworks explode, sending sparks, smoke, and ashes in all directions.
  6. The mass of the universe will determine its fate.
  7. many answers.







Reference:


Complete Test Preparation for the GED Test 2014 by Steck-Vaughn